New competition for the Flat Earth Society

Supermarkets are easy, apparently. So easy, according to this article on Stuff, that you can set up and run a chain of them and at the same time “actively work towards other government goals across the environment, technology, business, and the labour market.”

What does that mean? The author helpfully explains (I am not making this up, somebody actually said this):

  • develop[ing] skills and technology in software, robotics, and distribution systems
  • developing 21st-century skills across the New Zealand workforce.
  • sustainable practices such as innovative packaging, bulk product refill stations
  • solar-powered warehouses could give consumers more reasons to use Kiwishop
  • prioritising local suppliers to reduce transportation costs
  • ensure better nutritional values for produce
  • incentives for food suppliers to use sustainable practices… utilising hybrid, organic, or te ao Māori farming methods
  • sustainable seafood manufacturing practices could be rewarded, further enabling the Government to achieve its related objectives.
  • better business practices, such as paying staff at least the living wage
  • strong work-based education programmes
  • leading to poverty alleviation, increased literacy, and a reduction in prisoner recidivism.

That’s right. The government’s new supermarket will help solve climate change and lower recidivism. All while remaining competitive with Foodstuffs and Progressive. It is just that easy to sell food.

Kiwishop is an opportunity to create a new ecosystem of food sourcing and sales with a smarter way of achieving economic, social, and environmental aims. In short, a much-needed disruptor in a market that has stunk for far too long.

The world is just one big free lunch. God help me.

The author concludes,

Kiwishop is a big idea, but so is KiwiSaver, Kiwibank, and Three Waters. We know how to do big in this small country.

What, no Kiwibuild or Kiwirail?

Venezuela has state supermarkets. Looks like their low, low prices deliver empty, empty shelves. Sorpresa!

Source: npr.org

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